2023 HO 6.7 500HP 1200FTLB

How many have seen the specs on the new HO 6.7L powerstroke?

As the title says, 500hp and 1200ftlb.

Crazy numbers. They made changes to the engine to handle and make the new power.
 

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silent64

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Question, I'm confused. How does a cast aluminum exhaust manifold turn into stainless steel. Must be a new process i've never heard of !
 

sootie

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i believe they are switching from cast steel (the way they've always been) to stainless construction
 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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So stainless manifolds it is. Make more sense than aluminum! Water cooled turbo housing. Did he say turbo, or turbine housing?
 

6.7Bison

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I heard turbo housing in that video. The turbos on the 6.7 Powerstroke already have water cooled bearing housings on them so I'm almost certain they are talking about turbine housing cooling.

 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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I heard turbo housing in that video. The turbos on the 6.7 Powerstroke already have water cooled bearing housings on them so I'm almost certain they are talking about turbine housing cooling.

Very interesting, I wonder why Ford would need to use it?
 

ToMang07

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I heard turbo housing in that video. The turbos on the 6.7 Powerstroke already have water cooled bearing housings on them so I'm almost certain they are talking about turbine housing cooling.

I was wondering about that myself.

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6.7Bison

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I have two and a half semi-educated guesses. To bring down exhaust heat, to bring down an engine bay hot spot, or a bit of both. Stainless manifolds and cooled turbine housing may allow for higher sustained EGTs while still meeting OEM reliability standards of the exhaust system. I don't know if any of the emissions equipment has a "too hot" temperature range that could be a limiting factor on the current 6.7L powerstrokes. May at least help with some of the common warped manifolds and broken rear studs. By cooling the hot turbine housing sitting in the valley of the engine it may cool the ambient components such as the upper intake manifold and the compressor housing giving a slight gain in efficiencies. This one makes less sense to me personally as the complexities look to outweigh the benefits, but I don't always agree with OEM solutions.
 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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Sounds like a good guess to me. Being they have steel pistons they could be planning on hotter than normal exhaust Temps. They have the components in place to do it.
 

ToMang07

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Sounds like a good guess to me. Being they have steel pistons they could be planning on hotter than normal exhaust Temps. They have the components in place to do it.
"Hotter " does seem the trend on these newer trucks

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ToMang07

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How's your pickup been treating you? I take it yours runs hotter than you are used to seeing?
Yeah, I was shocked to see the tranny running over 200°F unloaded highway. They definitely run much hotter than the older motors. I'm interested to see how it does this winter plowing, especially with the 2 separate cooking systems.


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J98

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Yeah, I was shocked to see the tranny running over 200°F unloaded highway. They definitely run much hotter than the older motors. I'm interested to see how it does this winter plowing, especially with the 2 separate cooking systems.


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I have driven a few of the 20+ L5P's unloaded. I don't know what they did differently but the temp gauge seems to stay pegged on 150*.

Seems almost too low.
 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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Yeah, I was shocked to see the tranny running over 200°F unloaded highway. They definitely run much hotter than the older motors. I'm interested to see how it does this winter plowing, especially with the 2 separate cooking systems.


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Thats interesting, I would have never have guessed it was that warm. I do understand why they are doing it. Warmer thinner fluids have less drag. So it should help with making the drive train more efficient. That intern should help with high MPGs, how much I have no clue.

Marks explanation make perfect sense though. In the sense of efficiency you can have to cool of fluids.
 
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