Backfeed panel from generator.

Sterling6.7

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Need to verify what is in your breaker box.

usually they are 220 volt, the breakers on the left are one leg at 110 volt, the breakers on the right are a different leg of 110 volt.

So is the plug on your breaker box wired to one leg? Or is it wired into both legs?

if it is wired into one leg, then it should work. If wired into both legs then that is your problem.

When I was running 110, I moved all my "needed" circuits to one side of the box.

Feeding now with 220, I just turn on whatever I need.

I would probably be feeding from the 220 circuit on your Gen, probably solve your problem.
Most likely your furnace and well pump are both 220 volt.

For me, I have a 5k generator. Once I get it up and running I have to start my furnace first. Because startup takes the most current.
After it is up and running, I switch the fan to ON so it stays on. No more startup spikes.

Then I will turn on circuits I need.

When i had a well I would have to alternate between the well pump and the furnace, 5k would not run both all the time, usually when the well kicked on it would just trip out.

I would heat the house up, then swap to well water so everyone could shower and we could cook, then back to heat for the night.

You don’t know half of what you are talking about and someone will get hurt listening to you. Different brand of panels have different layouts. Most single-phase resi type panels built since the ‘60s alternate the phases vertically, not horizontally. Odd numbered circuits on the left, even on the right. Circuits 1 and 2 are A phase, 3 and 4 are B phase, 5 and 6 are A phase and so on.

Most small well pumps are 240-volts, some are 120-volts.

An electric furnace will likely be 240-volts, a gas or oil furnace will likely be 120-volts.

The GFI on the gen is tripping because there is more than a 5MA difference between the amperage leaving and the amperage returning on the neutral. I have not personally troubleshot this, but in theory, the neutral/ground bond in the panel allows current flow towards the lower impedance grounding path. Could also be a circuit with a ground incorrectly attached to the neutral causing the same issue.
 

Sterling6.7

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If you post photos of the outlet and the panel with the cover off, I can offer some input. If you are uncertain or uncomfortable at all with electricity, ask for some in person help from someone local. It’s not worth getting the shit shocked out of yourself or going phase-to-phase in your face.
 

DEEZUZ

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Powerstroke Cowboy

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I personally would wire in the backfeed at 240 volts. You cant run both the furnace and well off of one 120 volt plug. Not enough amps.
 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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I am sure you know this. But I need to say it. Make sure you flip the disconnect at the pole/meter so you are not back feeding the power lines. Linemen have been fried from generator's.
 

Sterling6.7

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Yes, correct. The 100-amp 2-pole breaker at the top labeled “Main breaker”. You must turn this off first, before connecting the generator.
 

Powerstroke Cowboy

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That would be the main right

The main breaker at the electric meter base. You could do the main in the panel box if you were wanting to keep the power from going beyond that panel box. If you are back feeding from the barns panel box to the house panel box, you will not be able to flip the main in the barn or the house if both ar feed from the meter base at the pole. If they are, you need to flip the main disconnect at the pole/meter base.

On edit: If you barn panel is a sub panel off the house panel, then you could just turn of the house panels main breaker. But if both are feed from the meter base, you need to turn off the main disconnect.
 
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